Posts Tagged ‘Tbilisi’

Russia’s War in Georgia and the background chronology to it

3 september, 2008

Som ett komplement till mina tidigare inlägg Russia’s Disinformation Campaign over South Ossetia och Before the Gunfire, Cyberattacks against Georgia kommer här en mycket intressant kronologi over händelseutvecklingen som lede fram till Rysslands invasion av Georgien från Central Asia-Caucasus Institute.

Som jag konstaterat tidigare så visar även denna kronologi på de långtgående ryska förberedelserna långt innan kriget. Och att den ryska planeringen var att ”göra något” i början/mitten av augusti. Vilket ju också skede.

De ryska styrkorna var förbereda och hade satt sig i rörelse före den 7-8 augusti då Georgien gick in i Tschinvali.

Här är en bra karta som visar de olika styrkornas utgångsläge och det inledande förloppet.

http://kommersant.ru/%5CISSUES.PHOTO%5CDAILY%5C2008%5C140%5C_2008140-01-01.jpg

           Klicka på kartan så blir den större/Click on the map

In August 2008, Russia launched an invasion of Georgia that sent shock waves reverberating – first across the post-Soviet space, but then also into the rest of Europe and the world, as the magnitude of the invasion and its implications became clear.

This invasion took the world by surprise. But what should have been surprising about it was perhaps the extent of Russia’s willingness to employ crude military force against a neighboring state, not that it happened. Indeed, Russia had for several years pursued increasingly aggressive and interventionist policies in Georgia, and had employed an array of instruments that included military means, albeit at a smaller scale. In the several months that preceded the invasion, Moscow‘s increasingly blatant provocations against Georgia led to a growing fear in the analytic community that it was seeking a military confrontation. Yet western reactions to this aggressive behavior remained declaratory and cautious in nature, and failed to attach cost to Russia for its behavior.

After invading Georgia on August 8, Russia did score some initial successes in portraying the invasion as a response to a Georgian decision to militarily enter Tskhinvali, the capital of Georgia’s breakaway region of South Ossetia. Yet a growing body of evidence rapidly emerged, implying that Russia’s invasion was premeditated, not reactive – or in the words of a leading Russian military analyst, planned, not spontaneous.

Indeed, as the chronology included in this paper shows, Russia had been meticulously preparing an invasion of Georgia through the substantial massing and preparation of forces in the country’s immediate vicinity. Scholars will debate whether Russian tanks were already advancing inside Georgian territory when Georgian forces launched their attack on Tskhinvali; yet there seems little doubt that they were at least on the move toward the border. And the scope of the Russian attack leave little doubt: it immediately broadened from the conflict zone of South Ossetia, to the opening of a second front in Abkhazia and systematic attacks on military and economic infrastructure across Georgia’s territory. Within days, tens of thousands of Russian troops and hundreds of tanks and armored vehicles roamed Georgian roads.

Russia’s subsequent decisions to ignore the terms of a cease-fire agreement it signed, and to recognize the independence of the breakaway republics of Abkhazia and South Ossetia, all complete the picture of long-hatched plan. The purpose was not merely related to South Ossetia or even Abkhazia: it served to punish Georgia and expose the inability of the west to prevent Russia from moving aggressively to restore its primacy over the former Soviet Union’s territory, irrespective of the wishes of the governments and populations of the sovereign countries on that area. It is indeed the predetermined nature of this war that makes its implications so far-reaching. It constituted Moscow’s first military aggression against a neighboring state since the invasion of Afghanistan in 1978; and it took place, this time, against a member state of European institutions such as the OSCE and the Council of Europe, and to that a country on track to integration with NATO.

As such, political leaders and analyst soon understood that it formed the largest crisis to date in Russia’s relationship with the West; some have even come to realize that the Georgian war of 2008 may be the most significant challenge to European Security since the Cold War’s end. It is therefore of particular importance to document, already at this stage, how this war started and draw some preliminary conclusions regarding what it means for Georgia, the post-Soviet space, and Europe and the United States. The following pages propose to do so by providing a chronology of events before, during, and immediately after the war; as well as to propose some initial conclusions that could be drawn from this chronology, as well as regarding its implications.

This chronology has been assembled to the extent possible based on multiple and independent sources, as well as on the personal notes of the authors, including experiences on the ground during the conflict. Given the recent nature of the events, however, it is possible that some information reflected here will need correction as more solid evidence emerges. The authors express their gratitude to David J. Smith and Jonathan Kulick for their comments on the chronology. The authors will be grateful to receive additional suggestions for corrections or additions

                  Russian invasion routes and forces

   Klicka på kartorna så blir den större/Click on the maps

           Russian-claimed security zone, South Ossetia

                 Russian bombing targets in Georgia

Summer 2004

Following an operation launched by the Georgian governments to curtail  rampant smuggling across South Ossetia, clashes between Georgian forces and South Ossetian separatists take place as Georgia sought to restory authority, with numerous deaths on both sides.

Winter 2005

Sergey Bagapsh assumes the de facto presidency of Abkhazia, following an election in which Moscow backed his opponent, Raul Khadzhimba. Bagapsh’s electoral victory led to strong Russian pressure on the de facto leadership, which forced Bagapsh to include Khadzhimba into his government as Vice President and hand him control of security and defense affairs.

Subsequently, serving Russian security and military officials are appointed to leading positions in the de facto governments of the unrecognized republics. Hence Russian general Soltan Soslaniev served as Abkhazia’s defense minister, while Anatoly Zaitsev became the de facto republic’s chief of staff. Likewise, South Ossetia‘s prime minister, Yuri Morozov, and security chief, Anatoly Barankevich, were among several Russian officers in the South Ossetian de facto government.

President Saakashvili presents peace plans to both Abkhazia and South Ossetia, both of which are rejected.

January 2006

Explosions occur on the Russian side of the Georgian-Russian border, damaging a gas pipeline and an electricity transmission line and cutting gas and electricity supplies to Georgia. These explosions occur days after Russia cut energy supplies to Ukraine, and are blamed on unidentified terrorists.

Spring 2006

Russia introduces an import ban on Georgian wine and mineral water, Georgia’s most lucrative export products, citing health and quality concerns.

Spring 2006

Russia builds a military base in the district of Java, north of Tskhinvali in South Ossetia, an area off limits to international observers. The base includes substantial refueling capabilities for tanks and armored vehicles.

July 2006

Under what is officially a law enforcement operation, Georgia takes control of the Kodori Gorge in Abkhazia, previously run by a local (Georgian) warlord. The Georgian Government-in-Exile for Abkhazia is installed in the Gorge. Georgia also intensifies efforts to internationalize the Russian-led peacekeeping formats in Abkhazia and South Ossetia.

September-October 2006

Georgia expels six Russian intelligence agents accused of espionage. Russia responds with a full economic embargo of Georgia, including the severance of all transportation and communication links, including rail, road, sea, air, postal, and banking ties. Russian law enforcement raids Georgian businesses in Russia and begins deporting Georgian citizens.

March 11, 2007

Georgian-controlled villages in the Kodori Gorge are attacked by ground-to ground rocket fire, likely from territory controlled by the Abkhaz de facto authorities. The attack is supported by Russian military helicopters, a fact obliquely confirmed by a subsequent report of the United Nations Observer Mission in Georgia (UNOMIG). Western leaders fail to react to the UNOMIG report.

May 2007

After elections held in parallel with elections for the Tskhinvali authorities, Georgia introduces a provisional administration in the parts of South Ossetia it controlled since the cease-fire of 1992, under the leadership of Dmitri Sanakoyev, a former high official in the separatist government.

August 6, 2007

A missile dropped by an aircraft lands undetonated near a Georgian radar in Tsitelubani in close proximity of South Ossetia, recently upgraded to NATO standards. Two teams of European and American experts conclude that the action must have been performed by the Russian Air Force. A Russian team of experts instead argues the incident had been staged by Georgia to create an impression of Russian aggression against the country.

February 17, 2008

Kosovo declares independence. President Putin claims Kosovo’s independence, if recognized by western states, will set a precedent with consequences for Abkhazia and South Ossetia. A few weeks later, in an interview with Nezavisimaya Gazeta, Konstantin Zatulin, Deputy Chairman of the Duma Committee on CIS and Compatriot Affairs, suggests the draft presidential decree may be just the first step toward Russian recognition of Abkhazia and South Ossetia. It is important to move now, says Zatulin, while Kosovo is still a fresh issue and well before the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi. ( For full details and documents, see the October 2007 Silk Road Paper published by the Joint Center, The August 6 Bombing Incident in Georgia: Implications for the Euro-Atlantic Region, by Svante E. Cornell, David J. Smith, and S. Frederick Starr).

March 5, 2008

Tbilisi withdraws from the Joint Control Commission overseeing negotiations over South Ossetia. It instead proposes a format which, apart from Georgia, South Ossetia and Russia, also envisages active roles for the EU, OSCE and the Sanakoyev administration.

March 6, 2008

Russia announces its withdrawal from the 1996 CIS sanctions treaty, which banned trade, economic, financial, transport and other links with Abkhazia.

March 28, 2008

President Mikheil Saakashvili outlines a new peace initiative for Abkhazia, including the establishment of a free economic zone, representation at all levels of the Georgian government, and far-reaching autonomy for Abkhazia.

April 3, 2008

At the NATO summit in Bucharest, Georgia is denied a Membership Action Plan. Georgia and Ukraine are nevertheless assured they will be offered NATO membership at an unspecified point in the future. German chancellor Angel Merkel stresses that a country with unresolved conflicts can nevertheless not join NATO.

April 16, 2008

A Russian presidential decree signed by outgoing President Vladimir Putin instructs the Russian government, as well as Russian regions, to open political, social, and economic relations with Abkhazia and South Ossetia. The decree in many ways establishes relations between Moscow and the two territories that approximate relations between Moscow and its federal subjects. This is interpreted in Tbilisi as a move to legalize a Russian annexation of the two regions.

April 18, 2008

Abkhazia claims Georgia is reinforcing its troops along the cease-fire line and in the Kodori Gorge. UNOMIG nevertheless states that no troop increases have taken place.

April 21, 2008

An unarmed Georgian UAV (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle) is downed over Abkhazia. Citing footage from the UAV’s camera capturing its own destruction by a MiG-29 aircraft as well as radar recordings showing an aircraft taking off from the Gudauta airbase in Abkhazia and departing into Russian airspace, Georgia accuses the Russian Air Force of downing the UAV. This triggers a diplomatic row, as Tbilisi claims Russia is engaging in military action in Abkhazia, while Russia denies responsibility, claiming the plane was shot down by the Abkhaz air defenses. A UNOMIG investigation subsequently concludes in May that the aircraft was Russian.

April 24, 2008

At the UN, the U.S., UK, France and Germany, all members of the Group of Friends of the Secretary General for Georgia, express concern over Russia’s policy toward Abkhazia and South Ossetia, and President Saakashvili calls for talks on internationalizing the peacekeeping missions in the two regions.

April 29, 2008

The Russian Ministry of Foreign Affairs claims Georgia has reinforced its military presence in the Kodori Gorge, preparing for an invasion of Abkhazia. Russia confirms it is reinforcing its peacekeeping contingent in Abkhazia, and setting up several new checkpoints along the Inguri River. UNOMIG subsequently denies any troop buildup in the Kodori Gorge or along the cease-fire line.

May 8, 2008

Russia confirms having increased its peacekeeping contingent in Abkhazia from 1997 to 2542 soldiers.

May 14, 2008

Abkhazia’s leader Sergey Bagapsh requests permanent Russian military presence in Abkhazia. Such plans are later denied by the Chief of the General Staff of the Russian Armed Forces. Georgian officials say a war between Georgia and Russia has been avoided due to French mediation.

May 16, 2008

The UN General Assembly passes a resolution tabled by Georgia on the right of return of all IDPs to Abkhazia. The U.S. votes for the resolution, Russia against; most western European states abstain.

May 21, 2008

Georgia holds parliamentary elections. Two buses intended for transporting Georgians in the Gali region to polling stations are blown up in Khurcha, just across the border in Georgia, injuring four. Tbilisi claims the Abkhaz side is responsible. Later reports by UN observers suggest the incident was staged by Georgian officials.

May 31, 2008

The Russian Ministry of Defense sends about 400 troops from the Russian Defense Ministry Railway Forces to rehabilitate Abkhazian railways. Tbilisi accuses Russia of improving the infrastructure in Abkhazia in preparation for a military intervention.

June 16, 2008

One person is killed and four injured in a skirmish between Georgian and South Ossetian forces in the outskirts of Tskhinvali. Georgian forces confiscate heavy equipment including anti-tank missiles from Russian peacekeepers on the Georgian side of the Georgian-Abkhaz administrative border – weaponry that, according to the agreement on peacekeeping, required notification of Georgian authorities.

June 21, 2008

In an interview with the Georgian newspaper Rezonansi, respected Russian military analyst Pavel Felgenhauer stated that a political decision to start a war in Georgia had been taken in Moscow as early as April. He predicted that a war would start in Abkhazia no later than the middle of August.

July 1, 2008

Sukhumi closes Abkhazia’s de facto border with Georgia.

July 3-4, 2008

An explosion in the South Ossetian village of Dmenisi kills a South Ossetian police chief. Later the same day, a mine attack on a convoy carrying Dmitri Sanakoyev injures three Georgian policemen near Tskhinvali. The attack is followed by an exchange of fire between Sanakoyev’s security personnel and unknown gunmen. At least two people die in shellings in Tskhinvali and surrounding villages.

July 5, 2008

The information services of the North Caucasian Islamic resistance publish an article on their website, Kavkaz-Center, stating that Russia will wage a war in Georgia in August, but placing it in Abkhazia.

July 8, 2008

The Georgian MOD reports the intrusion of four Russian aircraft over South Ossetia. Russia confirms its aircraft entered Georgian airspace to ”cool hotheads”, marking the first instance of a violation of airspace not denied by Russia.

July 15, 2008

Russia launches a large-scale military exercise, ”Kavkaz-2008”, in 11 regions in the vicinity of the Georgian border. Approximately 8,000 army servicemen participate in the training, which engages paratroopers, the Pskov Airborne division and the Black Sea Fleet. 700 combat vehicles and 20 aircraft are activated and undergo readiness inspections. The Russian authorities refer to the exercise as a pre-planned counter-terrorism operation, but states also that it aims to prepare the troops for involvement in special peacekeeping operations, due to the latest developments in the region.

July 30, 2008

The Russian Ministry of Defense announces the completion of the repair of the 54-kilometer railway linking the Abkhazian capital of Sukhumi with the region of Ochamchire in the Abkhazian conflict zone.

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List of Gazprom’s huge empire of subsidiaries – Part 1

20 augusti, 2008

Som en fortsättning på mina tidigare inlägg Before the Gunfire, Cyberattacks against GeorgiaGazprom and Nord Stream’s strong PR drive to influence local governments,   The Re-Sovietization of the Russian Press and Gazprom’s active part in it.Russia’s Gazprom’s Energy ImperialismScratch Russia Georgia War and You Find Oil and Gas Pipelines och Moscow’s Sinister Brilliance – Who wants to die for Tbilisi or Stockholm? kommer här en lång lista över alla dotterbolag som jätten Gazprom helt eller ”delvis” kontrollerar.  Samt en lista över EN DEL av dessa dotterbolag per land. (Se part 2 av detta inlägg)

Se även mina tidigare inlägg om försvaretVi har en Försvarsmakt i fullständigt fritt fall – 2”Vi har en Försvarsmakt i fullständigt fritt fall”Försvaret – vilken total INKOMPETENS!Vårt dyra lilla kastrerade försvar!, Vårt dyra lilla försvar – 2 och  Vårt dyra lilla försvar

Jätten Gluffs Gluffs någon? Sverige är ju i sammanhanget inte ens en mumsbit för detta ”företag”.

Det är alltså denne jätte som nu ligger bakom Nord Stream projektet och dragningen av gasledningen genom östersjön. Samt byggandet av en ”service” plattform utanför Gotland. Ett projekt som de vill genomdriva till varje pris. Med backning av HELA den ryska staten och militären.

Denna gasledning, liksom andra, har ju av Putin och den ryske försvarsledningen    förklarats som ett ryskt nationellt säkerhetsintresse.

Den ryske marinchefen Admiral Vladimir Masorin beskrev utförligt den ryska marinens deltagande i arbetet kring förberedelserna för dragningen av gasledningen genom östersjön på Gazproms begäran. Hur rysk militär personal deltagit på ”forskningsfartyget” Akademik Golitsyn etc.

Frågan från reportern var: ”Herr amiral, i dag är inte marinens enda uppgift att tillgodose landets säkerhetsbehov, utan också att skydda dess ekonomiska intressen. Var snäll och berätta om hur Östersjöflottan deltar i anläggandet av den nordliga gasledningen.”

Intervjun finns här: http://www.redstar.ru/2007/07/25_07/3_03.html

På detta ”reagerade” svenska kustbevakningen som skall ”övervaka” det hela så här:

”Kustbevakningen är den svenska myndighet som över- vakar den svenska ekonomiska zonen.

Vi har fått reda på att det finns den här typen av kompetens ombord (dvs. personal från ryska försvarsministeriet). Men vi har inte sett några uniformer och utgår från att de följer givna tillstånd. De får inte göra undersökningar med militärt syfte. Om de å andra sidan gör saker som inte är till- låtna är det kanske inget de visar upp, säger avdelningsjurist Sten-Olov Södergård vid kustbevakningen.

Akademik Golitsyn är special- utrustat för att manövrera en undervattensfarkost som sänks ner från akterdäck och tar sig fram på havsbotten med larv- fötter.”

http://www.svd.se/nyheter/inrikes/artikel_254637.svd

Viss är det skönt med sådana ”kompetenta” myndigheter som skall värna vårt land och svenska intressen.

Glöm inte heller Putins uttalade i rysk TV att ”Den ryska Östersjöflottans uppgift är att eventuellt skydda våra ekonomiska intressen i Östersjön. En av våra viktigaste prioriteringar är gasledningen som går genom Östersjön” (26 oktober 2006).

Och så här sa ”president” Medvedev i går:

”If someone thinks they can kill our citizens, kill soldiers and officers fulfilling the role of peacekeepers, we will never allow this,” Mr Medvedev told a group of Second World War veterans in Kursk. ”Anyone who tries to do this will receive a shattering blow.”

He continued: ”Russia has the capabilities – economic, political and military. Nobody has any illusions left about that.”

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/world/europe/article4557369.ece

Och här kommer mera fredsälskande uttalanden från ryska militärer:

”General Anatoly Nogovitsyn, deputy chief of Russia’s general staff, who said that Poland had exposed itself to the threat of nuclear attack from Moscow by agreeing with America to place a missile shield on Polish soil.”

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/comment/leading_article/article4547715.ece

”Russia is considering arming its Baltic fleet with nuclear warheads for the first time since the cold war, senior military sources warned last night.

The move, in response to American plans for a missile defence shield in Europe, would heighten tensions raised by the advance of Russian forces to within 20 miles of Tbilisi, the Georgian capital, yesterday.

Under the Russian plans, nuclear warheads could be supplied to submarines, cruisers and fighter bombers of the Baltic fleet based in Kaliningrad, a Russian enclave between the European Union countries of Poland and Lithuania. A senior military source in Moscow said the fleet had suffered from underfunding since the collapse of communism. ”That will change now,” said the source.”

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/world/europe/article4547883.ece

Här en liten notis om den ryska flottans markering, närvaro och övningar vid norska gas plattformar i fjol. Och det här var EFTER att StatoilHydro hade slutit ett avtal med Gazprom om Shtokman fältet mitt i Barents hav.

”Russian aircraft carrier training next to Norwegian oil platform

2007-12-11

The Russian Northern Fleet has started a training operation in the close vicinity of a Norwegian oil platform in the North Sea. The heavy military air activities have made StatoilHydro temporary halt helicopter traffic to and from the ”Troll” platform

Several types of military ships, as well as a tanker and 47 aircrafts, are involved in the training. Also strategic bombers are engaged, VG Nett reports.

Several aircrafts and helicopters are in the air around the aircraft carrier ”Admiral Kuznetsov”, which is located near the ”Troll” platform. The military flying has made StatoilHydro halt helicopter traffic to and from the platform

The Norwegian Defence confirms that the Russian training is taking place. Norwegian Coast Guard vessels have been sent to the area to monitor the situation. ,More than aircraft carrier ”Admiral Kuznetsov” has started

The Russian Northern Fleet vessels are most probably on their way to the Mediterranian where Russia has signalled that it wants to strengthen its presence.

The training near the ”Troll” platform inevitably contributes to increased uncertainty in Norway about Russian ambitions in the North. Both Norway and Russia have the last years expressed their intention to step up their presence in the area following the plans for major Arctic oil and gas projects.

The Russian training operation near the ”Troll” could possibly be seen as a signal from the Russian Armed Forces about their intention to stay put in the High North and to protect Russian economic interests in the area.

For StatoilHydro, which recently signed a deal with Russia’s Gazprom over the Shtokman field, the Russian exercise can be seen as a sign of which challenges the company could encounter in the Barents Sea.”

http://www.barentsobserver.com/index.php?id=4442850&cat=16149&xforceredir=1&noredir=1

Och här en liten notis om att ryska flottan skall bygga 5-6 nya ”carrier groups” kring nya hangarfartyg. Placering? – ”The Northern and Pacific Fleets”.

”Russia to have 5-6 aircraft carriers in Northern, Pacific Fleets

27/07/2008 13:01 ST. PETERSBURG, July 27 (RIA Novosti) Russia will create 5-6 aircraft carrier groups in the Northern and Pacific Fleets, the Navy commander said on Sunday.

Admiral Vladimir Vysotsky said the Navy command had decided to build sea-borne aircraft carrier systems for these fleets instead of simply aircraft carriers.

”Everything must work in a system, including aircraft carriers. We have called them sea-borne aircraft carrier systems, which will be based in the Northern and Pacific Fleets. The construction of such systems will begin after 2012,” Vysotsky said before reviewing a military parade on the occasion of Navy Day in Russia.

Vysotsky said new sea-borne aircraft carrier systems will operate in close contact with Russia‘s orbital group of military satellites, and also with the Air Force and air defense.

At present, Russia has only one operational aircraft carrier, the Nikolai Kuznetsov, which was commissioned in the early 1990s and has recently re-entered service after a prolonged overhaul.

The ship, also known as Project 1143.5 heavy aircraft carrier, is currently deployed with Russia’s Northern Fleet and has recently participated in a two-month tour to the Mediterranean as part of Russia’s plans to resume its continual presence in different regions of the world’s seas.”

http://en.rian.ru/russia/20080727/115004797.html

Och var är våra ”käcka” gossar och flickor i uniform? Ja INTE är de på Gotland eller fastlandet. Nej de ”försvarar” våra ”intressen” i Afghanistan och Tchad. Och den främsta prioritering för försvaret är att bekämpa ”klimat hotet” enligt försvarsberedningen..

Se där ytterligare en av dessa eminenta politiska prioriteringar från våra intälägänta företrädare i riksdagen och regeringen (nuvarande och tidigare).

Och vår statsminister sa så här efter utrikesnämnden sammanträde igår:

”Senare i höst kommer regeringens inriktningsproposition för försvaret, och det finns anledning att diskutera vilken påverkan det som hänt i Georgien har på Sverige. Men det behöver inte omedelbart översättas i nya slutsatser, sa Fredrik Reinfeldt.”

http://www.dn.se/DNet/jsp/polopoly.jsp?a=817530

Och vår s.k. försvarsminister sa så här i sin debattartikel i söndags:

”Kriget i Georgien kommer att få varaktiga politiska konsekvenser och starkt påverka bilden av Ryssland. Rysslands agerande har gått långt utöver mandatet för de fredsbevarande styrkor, som landet haft i Sydossetien.

Militärt övervåld har använts och Georgiens territoriella integritet har allvarligt kränkts. Det politiska och militära syftet med insatsen har varit långtgående. Det är oacceptabelt att motivera agerandet med att gripa in för ryska medborgare i andra länder.”

Och efter denna markering så kommer slutsatsen för Sveriges del:

”Under hösten kommer regeringskansliet i arbetet med den nya försvarspolitiska inriktningen att uppdatera och fördjupa den säkerhetspolitiska analysen.”

http://www.svd.se/opinion/brannpunkt/artikel_1573813.svd

Ehh… Han menar alltså att MERA av den eminenta ”analys” som hittills har lett till att Sverige INTE kan värna sina gränser eller territorium skulle vara svaret på Rysslands agerande. Däremot så skall vi som sagt fortsätta att ”bekämpa” ”klimat hotet” för det känns ju mera angeläget eller hur.

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